Honestly, we're surprised the number isn't even higher.

By Austin Cannon
October 29, 2020
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Bred to be companions, pugs love to snuggle and lounge the day away. They're patient and playful with kids, too, making them a favorite amongst the under-18 set.
| Credit: Johner Images/Getty

Great googly moogly, children are relentless. 

According to a survey from OnePoll that was commissioned by Spin Master, kids these days will on average ask their parents for a pet 1,584 times before they turn 18. The survey, which polled 2,000 parents of school-aged kids, says that 74 percent of kids have asked for a pet, averaging 11 requests per month beginning at the age of 6.

It works, too. Some two-thirds of the parents eventually give in to the demands after about three years of their offspring badgering them, the survey says.

Think of it this way: The multitude of children’s pet requests are like the numerous snowflakes that fell on top of the Hubert Humphrey Metrodome in 2010. Much like many parents, the roof soon caved

The bad news for parents here is that the pet requests ain’t gonna stop anytime soon. We’re about to enter the holiday season, and your kids have just the perfect gift in mind. The poll reports that 62 percent of the pet-obsessed kids are gonna ask for a furry new buddy some 18 times per month as we approach the holidays.

Most kids—78 percent—ask their parents for a dog or puppy, while 45 percent ask for a cat or kitten. (Adding those two percentages together leads one to believe that some kids are asking for both.) 

Most parents, 78 percent again, want their kids to start small and train with something like a toy pet before a real-life dog or cat joins the family. So maybe have your kids pretend to feed a stuffed animal or place some kind of fake dog poop out in the yard for them to pick up. 

We’re on your side, fellow adults. You can show your kid all the things you need to prepare to adopt a dog or a cat. Pet costs, after all, are a thing, too, and you want to make sure your children know how much time and money a new pet will involve. That way, you can explain to your kids why a few years down the road is the best time to get that new puppy. 

Adults: This article is over. Have a good day.

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Pssst. OK kids, now that the adults are gone, here’s the real advice: Keep asking for that dog or cat. Don’t let up. Beg your parents morning, noon, and night. Build a PowerPoint presentation about why pets are great for families. Show them cute dogs available at the local shelter. Keep going. It may take a few years, but they’ll fold.