Treat your pup to the classic flavors of fall with these crunchy treats.
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woman holding plate of homemade pumpkin dog treats
Credit: Daily Paws / Jason Donnelly

A fall staple, pumpkin is a delicious and nutritious option for your pup when prepared safely. These pumpkin dog treats are no exception, making a yummy snack no matter the time of year. With just seven ingredients, these treats are easy to make—requiring you to simply mix the ingredients in bowls and combine to create the dough. Then knead, roll, and cut the dough into cookies and pop them into the oven. Not only are these treats easy to make, but you can get creative by using cookie cutters to make them whatever shape you desire. Once they're out of the oven and cooled off, your pup will surely be happy to be your taste tester. 

Prep: 20 mins

Bake: 35 mins

Total: 55 mins

Yield: About 120 small treats

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup flaxseed meal
  • 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • ⅔ cup reduced-sodium beef or chicken broth or water
  • ½ cup canned pumpkin*
  • 1 tablespoon honey

Directions

Step One
Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper; set aside. In a large bowl combine the flour, flaxseed meal, and turmeric.

Step Two
In a small bowl, stir together the egg, broth, pumpkin, and honey. Using a wooden spoon, stir pumpkin mixture into flour mixture until as well mixed as possible. Using hands, continue kneading dough until fully combined (dough will be quite stiff).

Step Three
On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to between 1/8- and 1/4-inch thick. Using 1 1/2-inch cookie cutters or a sharp knife, cut into desired shapes. Arrange shapes on prepared baking sheet. Bake 35 to 40 minutes or until biscuits feel dry and firm (treats will continue to harden as they cool). 

Step Four
Store treats in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks or freeze up to 3 months.

Tips

*Use regular canned pumpkin, not pumpkin pie filling.

Treats should make up no more than 10 percent of a dog's daily calorie intake.